• The role of electromyography in the diagnosis and treatment of women a mixed group with combined pathology of neurogenic lower urinary tract and the distal colon
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The role of electromyography in the diagnosis and treatment of women a mixed group with combined pathology of neurogenic lower urinary tract and the distal colon

HEALTH OF WOMAN. 2018.1(127):82–84; doi 10.15574/HW.2018.127.82

S.O. Vozianov, M.P. Zakharash, P.V. Chabanov, Yu.M. Zakharash, N.A. Sevastyanova, V.Yu. Ugarov, A.S. Reprintseva
Institute of Urology of the National Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv
National Medical University named after O.O. Bohomoltsya, Kyiv
«Center of primary health care № 2» of Solomyansky district, Kyiv

The objective: increase the effectiveness of treatment for women with combined neurogenic pathology of the lower urinary tract and distal colon.
Materials and methods. The study included 30 women who evaluated the effectiveness of treatment by using clinical and electromyographic examinations.
Results. It has been established that electromyography reflects the functional state of the urinary tract and distal colon sections in their combined pathology. The obtained results were the basis for substantiating the principles of differentiated treatment of patients with combined neurogenic pathology of the lower urinary tract and distal colon, which allowed to increase the effectiveness of treatment.
Conclusion. Conservative treatment of patients of this category by means of electrostimulation is effective.
Key words: neurogenic disorders in urination, intestine neurogenic dysfunction, electromyography, electrostimulation.

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