• Immediate and long-term outcomes of surgical aortic valvuloplasty in infants

Immediate and long-term outcomes of surgical aortic valvuloplasty in infants

PERINATOLOGY AND PEDIATRIC. UKRAINE. 2018.2(74):108-111; doi 10.15574/PP.2018.74.108

Chornenka Ye. M., Maksymenko A. V., Kurkevych A. K.
SI «Scientific and Practical Medical Centre for Paediatric Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery of the Ministry of Health of Ukraine», Kyiv

Objective: to investigate the outcomes of surgical valvuloplasty in newborns and infants with isolated aortic stenosis.
Material and methods. During the period of 2011–2015 in SI «Scientific and Practical Medical Centre for Paediatric Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery of the Ministry of Health of Ukraine», in total 47 patients under one year of age underwent surgical valvuloplasty as the primary method of correcting isolated aortic stenosis. The median age was 1.7 months (from 4 days after birth to 10.7 months). The average weight was 4.9 ± 1.6 kg (from 3 to 9.7 kg). There was no aortic valve insufficiency prior to the operation in 41 (87.2%) patients. The mean maximum gradient on the aortic valve was 85.4 ± 19.9mm Hg (from 46 to 140mm Hg).
Results. The median of the long-term follow-up period was 3.8 years (from 1.5 months to 6.2 years). The mean maximum gradient on the aortic valve was 28.7±17.4 mm Hg (from 9 to 97 mm Hg). In most patients, insufficiency was either not noted, or was mild. There was no hospital lethality. The long-term mortality was observed in 2.1% of patients (1 case).
Conclusions. Aortic valve insufficiency of grade 0-II at discharge was noted in 97.9% of patients, and in the long-term period – in 78.2%. Only 4.3% of patients underwent reoperation during the period of 3.8 years (the maximum follow_up period was 6.2 years). In the study group, there was no need of the aortic valve replacement. In the long_term period, the mean maximum gradient of the aortic valve was 28.7 mm Hg.
Key words: aortic stenosis, surgical aortic valvuloplasty, newborns, infants.

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