• Evaluation of serum cholecalciferol in children with cystic fibrosis

Evaluation of serum cholecalciferol in children with cystic fibrosis

PERINATOLOGY AND PEDIATRIC. UKRAINE. 2018.3(75):82-87; doi 10.15574/PP.2018.75.82

Dudnуk V. M., Demianyshyna V. V.
National Pirogov Memorial Medical University, Vinnytsia, Ukraine

Objective: to estimate serum cholecalciferol in children with cystic fibrosis.

Materials and methods. In total 74 children aged up to 17 years were examined. Gender, age, physical development, exocrine pancreatic function, and functional state of the lungs were evaluated. The serum level of cholecalciferol was determined in all patients. For comparison, a group of healthy children was examined.

Results. The mean value of cholecalciferol was 28.9±0.86 ng/mL. Among the children examined, 36.5% had an optimum level of cholecalciferol, in 58.1% of patients decreased level were detected, and in 5.4% of patients its insufficiency was determined. In remission, the mean cholecalciferol level made up 26.16±1.21 ng/mL, which was significantly lower (p<0.05) as compared to the patients in the exacerbation phase — 29.85±1.04 ng/mL. In children with pancreatic deficiency, a decreased cholecalciferol level was observed — 28.77±0.85 ng/mL. In patients with faecal elastase$1 level (FE-1) less than 100 ng/mg, cholecalciferol was 24.67±1.33 ng/mL, and in case of FE-1 level from 100 to 200 ng/mg, cholecalciferol level was 37.57±5.57 ng/mL. In children with optimum cholecalciferol level, the parameters of the external respiratory function were higher, and the signs of obstructive$restrictive disorders were less severe.

Conclusions. Among the examined children, 63.5% had a reduced and insufficient cholecalciferol level. Insufficient level was observed most often among primary school$aged children. In remission, the mean level was 1.14 times lower compared with those indices at the exacerbation phase. In patients with low FE-1 level, cholecalciferol was 1.5 times lower as well. Spirometry indicators in children with low levels of cholecalciferol were, on average, 1.3 times lower than in children who had an optimum vitamin level.

Key words: cystic fibrosis, cholecalciferol, children.

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Article received: Jun 20, 2018. Accepted for publication: Sep 02, 2018.