• The study of the effectiveness of actography in the risk group of placental dysfunction in the third trimester of pregnancy

The study of the effectiveness of actography in the risk group of placental dysfunction in the third trimester of pregnancy

HEALTH OF WOMAN. 2017.6(122):107–110; doi 10.15574/HW.2017.122.107

Zhuk S. I., Oshovskiy V. I., Solovey Ye. G.
National Medical Academy of Postgraduate Education P. L. Shupyk, Kiev

The objective: was to compare the frequency of diagnosis of fetal pathological conditions in the risk group of placental dysfunction (PD) in the III trimester of pregnancy.

Patients and methods. In a randomized controlled study, 240 pregnant women in the III trimester of pregnancy with risk factors for PD development participated. In group I (intervention group, n=115), instruction was given on the daily actography. Patients were advised to consider fetal movements after 28 weeks of pregnancy in the evening peak of emotional activity (from 20 to 22 hours) – at least 10 movements within 2 hours. In the absence of sufficient movements, it was recommended to record CTG in the morning peak of emotional activity (7–11 H). In the 2nd (control) group (n=125), the patients received standard prenatal care.

Results. The features of the course of the III trimester, childbirth and the early postpartum period were analyzed. It was revealed that the calculation of fetal movements in the evening peak of emotional activity does not affect perinatal indices, however it allows to improve detection of fetal growth retardation and does not increase the use of medical resources.

Conclusion. Increasing maternal awareness of the calculation of motor activity in the fetus ensures the optimization of antenatal monitoring.

The correct application of the fetal counting technique will allow the use of additional diagnostic methods in the presence of alarm signals, which, in turn, may have economic feasibility for the healthcare system.

Key words: actography, fetal monitoring, placental dysfunction, fetal growth retardation.

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