• Risks of miscarriage and noncarrying of pregnancy in women with excessive body weight, obesity and metabolic syndrome

Risks of miscarriage and noncarrying of pregnancy in women with excessive body weight, obesity and metabolic syndrome

HEALTH OF WOMAN. 2017.5(121):78–81

Dyndar O. A., Benyuk V. O., Lastoveckaya L. D.
Bogomolets national medical university, Kyiv

In the article, the analysis and an assessment of the risks of miscarriage and noncarrying of pregnancy in women with the excess body weight, obesity, and metabolic syndrome is carried out.

The objective: on the basis of a retrospective clinical and statistical analysis of pregnancy and childbirth in women with excessive body weight, obesity and metabolic syndrome, we assess the risk of miscarriage and noncarrying of pregnancy.

Patients and methods. On the basis of the retrospective analysis of 1.922 cases of pregnancy and childbirth, from which – in 740 women with excess body weight, 676 – with obesity I degree, 408 – with obesity ІІ degree and 98 – with an obesity third degree, assessment of the relative risk, odds ratio absolute risk, and index of potential harm was done with the definition of sensitivity and specificity of these studies are given.

Results. Of retrospective studies of the course of pregnancy and childbirth in women with the excess body weight and obesity, with calculation and assessment of the risks of miscarriage, noncarrying of pregnancy and premature childbirth, indicate a high incidence of reproductive loss in all 4 groups of women.

Conclusion. The risk of miscarriages and noncarrying of pregnancy increases linearly with increasing body mass index: 1.2 times with excess body weight, 1.5 at I, 1.8 at II and 3.5 times at obesity III degrees.

Key words: miscarriage, obesity, metabolic syndrome, risks.

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